Tuesday, January 24, 2006

Hungry Like Beowulf

Ravenous! Lately, there's no other word to describe Arthur and Beowulf as they actually finish all the dry food and wet food I put out for them. They've suddenly become kibble-carrying members of the clean plate club. My suspicion: they must be growing again, because they're not getting fat. On the other hand, maybe they just like the food.

A couple of months ago, we changed brands of food and switched to Wellness Super5Mix for dry and a mix of Solid Gold Blended Tuna , Solid Gold Chicken, Turkey, White Fish, and Liver,
and Avoderm Select Cuts for wet. This has definitely increased our cat food budget a bit, but I feel better about giving the boys even higher quality food than they were getting before.

I am slightly concerned, however, that the canned food they like best and devour most readily is the Solid Gold Blended Tuna. The Blended Tuna has incredible nutrition specs: a whopping 13.84% crude protein (most premium quality cat food has 10-11%), but should I be concerned about mercury levels?

11 comments:

baileyshelby said...

I would definately be concerned about mercury. I would also be concerned about flaxseed and garlic. Garlic over the long term is toxic to cats. I was feeding a raw food that had garlic in it and one of my cats started drooling all the time. Took him off it and he stopped. I consult with a holistic person for my cats and have also changed their foods lately. I had been feeding 2 kinds of Royal canin with Pro Pac kitten mixed in for variety. They don't care too much for the Pro Pac, but will eat it. Royal canin changed their product to include rosemary which is also toxic to cats. Her advise was to switch to Nutro Max kitten and/or Annamaet for high protein, which cats require and no junk cats normally don't eat, along with the Pro Pac. She also advises not to feed foods that have lots of veggies in them. Cats are carnivores.

baileyshelby said...

Also, I didn't notice the protein content of the foods you feed, but she also says, don't feed anything with protein lower than 33% and higher if possible, which is why you feed the kitten food. The Nutro, if you are interested is the kitten one in the yellow bag. Not the dark yellowish/orange one.

Scooby, Shaggy & Scout said...

baileyshelby is correct but I don't know how much a cat would have to consume to be toxic...
Sounds like you are aware but many readers aren't that protien in dry & wet foods are measured differently. See http://www.thepetcenter.com/imtop/dm.html for an explanation on this. The percentage in the canned food you mention is indeed the highest I've heard of translating to well over 90% protien. Lynne

baileyshelby said...

Didn't think about it yesterday, but holistic person doesn't want me feeding any wet food, I do for treats. There are a couple ingredients that she says to stay away from guar gum and carrageenan. Bad for cats too, I guess.

Muddy, BloggingCat.com said...

There's so much we still don't know about nutrition, but we fed Purina Cat Chow to our late cat, Buzzy, and he lived a long and happy life well into his teenage years, so it works.

Miz said...

I have always been taught to go easy on fish cat foods. They can cause crystals in the urine, like gout in humans. Male cats with their longer ureter get blockages from the crystals easier than females.
Fish is not a natural food for cats, cats only occasionally would catch a fish to eat. Fish cat foods came about during WW2 and the meat shortages, fish heads and bits were plentiful to feed pet cats.

baileyshelby said...

Tuna also blocks thiamine in cats.

Beau Beau & Angie said...

I have been researching the dry vs wet cat food theories and am trying different options with my two newly adopted cats. My biggest concern is that I don't want my male cat to end up with FLUTD. Two of my previous male cats had it and both ended up having a very traumatic surgery to unblock them (for good). Believe me, you never want your boys to have to go through that! That said, I wouldn't feed them any more tuna or fish related wet food. They have higher amounts of magnesium I believe and all in all tuna is not good for them. I used to also feed my previous male cats both dry and wet(different regular grocery store brands)cat foods. After their blockages they ended up on Science Diet C/D from the vet for the rest or their lives. I still can't figure out from all the things I've read which is better for the males though, wet or dry. One article will say one thing, and the next thing you read says the opposite. So, do your research, and don't feel bad about paying the extra $ for very good quality food for them now.

Rebecca and June said...

Hi !
I don't know about mercury, but my advice is to give only dry food to your cats. That's what all the vets we saw say, and that makes sense : dry food is better for the cat's teeth, and you can always leave some at the cat's disposal without it growing any germ or bacteria. Plus, cats love eating several small meals in a day, which only dry food allows. I give Royal Canin dry food to our two cats and they are very healthy. The kitten kind is made mainly of poultry, and our adukt cat gets the "sensitivity control sc31" which solved all her digestive problems.
Also I know that dry food makes cats drink a lot which is ver good for many things, including their kidneys.
Your site is very cool and your two boys are adorable...
Bonjour de France !
Rebecca & June

Anonymous said...

A word of caution: I know that most vets keep touting dry food and I listened to them, but my Vincent still ended up losing 6 teeth, and I just had to put him to sleep at the age of 12 due to kidney failure even though he loved water and had always spent a lot of time drinking water in the the tub. He survived 3 1/2 years after being diagnosed w/ vaccine induced fibrosarcoma and dealt with that just fine (6 surgeries & 17 radiation treatments) and never complained or lost his appetite, but with the kidney failure he couldn't eat, fluid built up around his lungs, he was having trouble breathing, and he cried miserably from the terrible pain in his belly. I had to let him go 8 days after diagnosis, March 24, 2006. I've since read that a diet of dry food leaves a cat chronically dehydrated no matter how much water they drink. Kidney failure is an awful thing and I feel terrible that I didn't push him to eat wet food - he never really liked it and the vets all said that dry was better, so I didn't pursue it - but I would never go that route again.

Vincent's Mom

Anonymous said...

I can't believe some of the stuff I am reading on this website.

1. Dry food is, at best, marginally better for a cat's teeth.

2. Vet's who recommend dry food do not know what they are talking about. Dry food is for the convenience of the owner, not the healtah of the cat.

3. True, dry food does make a cat drink more, but studies have shown that they will not make up the water loss due to eating dry food rather than wet food.

BH